Potential Impact of Telemedicine for Medication Abortion Policy and Programming Changes on Abortion Accessibility in the United States

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Objectives. To quantify the impact of telemedicine for medication abortion (TMAB) expansion or ban removal on abortion accessibility.

Methods. We included 1091 facilities from the 2018 Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health facility database and Planned Parenthood Web site, among which 241 did not offer abortion as sites for TMAB expansion. Accessibility was defined as the proportion of reproductive-aged women living within a 30-, 60-, or 90-minute drive time from an abortion-providing facility. We calculated accessibility differences between 3 scenarios: (1) facilities offering abortion in 2018 (reference), (2) the reference scenario in addition to all facilities in states without TMAB bans (TMAB expansion), and (3) all facilities (TMAB ban removal). We also stratified by state and urban–rural status.

Results. In 2018, 65%, 81%, and 89% of women lived within a 30-, 60-, or 90-minute drive time from an abortion-providing facility, respectively. Expansion and ban removal expanded abortion accessibility relative to the current accessibility scenario (range: 1.25–5.66 percentage points). Women in rural blocks experienced greater increases in accessibility than those in urban blocks.

Conclusions. TMAB program and policy changes could expand abortion accessibility to an additional 3.5 million reproductive-aged women.

Public Health Implications. Our findings can inform where to invest resources to improve abortion accessibility. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(8):1202–1211. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.306876)

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Jane W. Seymour, PhD, MPH , Terri-Ann Thompson, PhD , Dennis Milechin, GISP , Lauren A. Wise, ScD, SM , and Abby E. Rudolph, PhD, MPH Jane W. Seymour is with the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA, and Ibis Reproductive Health, Cambridge, MA. Terri-Ann Thompson is with Ibis Reproductive Health. Dennis Milechin is with Research Computing Services, Information Services and Technology, Boston University. Lauren A. Wise is with the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston University. Abby E. Rudolph is with the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. “Potential Impact of Telemedicine for Medication Abortion Policy and Programming Changes on Abortion Accessibility in the United States”, American Journal of Public Health 112, no. 8 (August 1, 2022): pp. 1202-1211.

https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.306876

PMID: 35830676